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Hello all, I’ve come across an issue I have not been able to solve. On my 2002, when I turn the key nothing happens. I have noticed my theft light is blinking when the key is in the on position. Is my key or ignition cylinder bad?
 

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I had a feeling that was it. I do want to mention it will work on occasion, but it’s very hit and miss if it will. My keys is severely worn down as well to were it’s pretty much been smoothed out around the edges on the key. Would that also have a factor?
 

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The "chip" is rather robust but the tumbler can cause trouble, as in, the switch that tells you have the key in position can fail to tell the car you put the key in.
That switch is delicate and depends on the tumbler being snug as it has a bump that closes the switch to tell the car you put a key in position.
-chart-
 

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I see. I think I’m going to go ahead and change the whole cylinder out and get new keys. Thank you for your help!
 

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I see. I think I’m going to go ahead and change the whole cylinder out and get new keys. Thank you for your help!
That's a major cost since you will have to pay someone to program the computer to recognize the new keys. May be have new keys cut to the old tumbler and then use the regular procedure to self program the key to the PCM. Or have the new keys cloned to the old key. At least on my 2001 and 2006 there is not a sensor to tell the car the key is in the ignition at least to start it. I installed five remote starts in these cars and the car will not look for key in cylinder to start.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I’ll still have to have it programmed from my understanding since I only have one key, self programming requires two already programmed keys from what I’ve been seeing.
 

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Call a good locksmith shop and save some serious money. We know when people try to fix this problem when they are clueless, and they usually have done major damage by the time we get called. There is a key-in-lock switch inside the lock housing. They do wear out - they're just spring-loaded, and the springs go after a number of years. Also, if your key is aftermarket or a clone it is prone to failure. You are correct, Ford 8-cut ignitions after 1998 require two programmed keys IN HAND in order to initiate OBP. Lastly, department store keys usually are nothing but copies of worn original keys.

A shop roadie can cut a new key by code and program from scratch. Trust me, you will save money in the long run.
 

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Call a good locksmith shop and save some serious money. We know when people try to fix this problem when they are clueless, and they usually have done major damage by the time we get called. There is a key-in-lock switch inside the lock housing. They do wear out - they're just spring-loaded, and the springs go after a number of years. Also, if your key is aftermarket or a clone it is prone to failure. You are correct, Ford 8-cut ignitions after 1998 require two programmed keys IN HAND in order to initiate OBP. Lastly, department store keys usually are nothing but copies of worn original keys.

A shop roadie can cut a new key by code and program from scratch. Trust me, you will save money in the long run.
So I did do that, and the locksmith told me there is no response from the transceiver back to the PATS system, causing keys to not be programmable and be read by the system. Ford discontinued those transceivers and no one sells them, I currently am in the process of tracking one down I know will work to replace my bad one.
 

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Exalted Grand Poobah
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Sounds like you called a scammer or a fly-by-nighter. If there's no response, it's because there is no signal from the PATS chip in the key bow. There is nothing active in the halo ring around the ignition cylinder to go bad. It's merely an electronic receiver - all the work is done by the transponder in the key bow. The only way the halo is dead is if someone tried to save money, mis-diagnosed the cause of the problem and mucked it up and now needs help. Seen that, scores of times.

I said to call a locksmith SHOP. A storefront business with established land phone lines and a fleet of trucks. Frankly, what you describe and the circumstances you describe leading up to it are virtually impossible. I've been a locksmith for 37 years and still cater to the antique car market in Collier County. I'm not some dumbass googling the problem...I gave you good advice. It's your wallet.
 

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You can always take the key to a hardware store that clones keys and ask them to verify your current key is in fact bad. If it is bad then there are two ways to go, one with a locksmith and the second to buy a new computer with keys and cylinder on the internet. I guess the third route is to use an upgraded version of Forscan software and program the key codes yourself to the computer. But you will still need to cut new keys. Locksmith is the easiest route to go. As far a my experience installing remote starts in these cars is you do not need a physical key in the cylinder to start the car, you just need to make sure the car gets a known key code. On the remote starts I have installed there is a key mounted in a module and it is stimulated by the remote start and code transmitted to the Halo ring at the cylinder by using a transmitter ring mounted just near the Halo ring.

Try this link. Search results for query: pats module
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sounds like you called a scammer or a fly-by-nighter. If there's no response, it's because there is no signal from the PATS chip in the key bow. There is nothing active in the halo ring around the ignition cylinder to go bad. It's merely an electronic receiver - all the work is done by the transponder in the key bow. The only way the halo is dead is if someone tried to save money, mis-diagnosed the cause of the problem and mucked it up and now needs help. Seen that, scores of times.

I said to call a locksmith SHOP. A storefront business with established land phone lines and a fleet of trucks. Frankly, what you describe and the circumstances you describe leading up to it are virtually impossible. I've been a locksmith for 37 years and still cater to the antique car market in Collier County. I'm not some dumbass googling the problem...I gave you good advice. It's your wallet.
I see I’m going to find and go to an actual shop. The service I used the first time I believe just issues jobs to independent locksmiths and does not have their own. Thank you for your help!
 

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You're welcome. Those phone-bank scammers are the bane of existence to every legitimate lockie who works hard to establish a good reputation in his/her community, only to have one of those jackasses show up in a passenger car, lowball a quote and then inflate the bill after they've done their damage. Saying your transceiver ring malfunctioned is like hearing one of your living-room chairs malfunctioned.

Don't bother with hardware stores or department stores. Those guys try, but they aren't locksmiths and never calibrate their rudimentary equipment to ensure accuracy. Trust me - I made more money from Ace Hardware customers after they - with all good intentions - screwed up a job and I was called in to rectify the damage. Think about it...you don't go to the grocery store for cancer surgery; why go to retail store clerks for quality lockwork? :)
 
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