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Discussion Starter #1
So I recently received a car from a lady I do yard work ford it s 2002 ford taurus dohc 3.0. Ling story short through a fuel pump in her and I drove it home. I'm needing to replace the crank seal but I cannot get the extended harmonic balancer off to save my life. I know its reverse threaded so I'm not turning it the wrong way. I've tried wedging it with a long breaker bar and turning the motor over. Ive tried an ELECTRIC AS IN PLUG IN impact wrench to no avail (makes about 230ftlbs of torque should've been plenty powerful) so I returned that and bought a compressor and a impact gun that makes 560ftlbs of torque. Is there a trick to removing this EXTENDED harmonic balancer? Or will making to swap to air get it done? I've only seen one other video on youtube with the same style harmonic and he ended up having to cut the damn thing off of there then cut the extended shaft off then was able to impact it off without an issue. But the guy literally cut it in 2 with a cutting wheel so he had to replace that whole assembly. I'm trying to find a way without destroying the harmonic?
 

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I pulled one with a dewalt cordless impact and didn't have any troubles. Patience and persistence and you'll get it.
 

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Don't use heat. The balancer itself is close to the engine, the pulley is extended off to be in line with the rest of the accessories. Yes the bolt is reverse threaded, but you will get exactly nowhere if you don't use something to keep the engine from turning. The factory service manual mentions a specific flex plate holding tool but any sort of ingenuity you can think of to keep the engine from turning will work here. The pulley is only at 74 ft/lbs so it's nothing crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Don't use heat. The balancer itself is close to the engine, the pulley is extended off to be in line with the rest of the accessories. Yes the bolt is reverse threaded, but you will get exactly nowhere if you don't use something to keep the engine from turning. The factory service manual mentions a specific flex plate holding tool but any sort of ingenuity you can think of to keep the engine from turning will work here. The pulley is only at 74 ft/lbs so it's nothing crazy.
I'm highly aware that I have to keep the harmonic from turning as I do this
Don't use heat. The balancer itself is close to the engine, the pulley is extended off to be in line with the rest of the accessories. Yes the bolt is reverse threaded, but you will get exactly nowhere if you don't use something to keep the engine from turning. The factory service manual mentions a specific flex plate holding tool but any sort of ingenuity you can think of to keep the engine from turning will work here. The pulley is only at 74 ft/lbs so it's nothing crazy.
I know that's why I cant seem for the life of me to see why it's so difficult. I know you have to keep the motor from turning I dont thing you read the thread correctly because I tried wedging with a breaker bar against the frame longer one against the ground both failed. It really baffles me because as you stated there normally around 80 ftlbs of torque but the electric 240ftlb wouldnt do it so I upgraded to an air system with 560ftlbs and still a no go. I'm going to try removing the starter and wedging the flywheel tomorrow and try to get it busted with a breaker bar. Because I had a similar issue with my buddies f150 where his studs for the wheel broke and the impact we had wasnt strong enough but with enough leverage I was able to just turn them out. More on the thread tomorrow thanks for your response
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I pulled one with a dewalt cordless impact and didn't have any troubles. Patience and persistence and you'll get it.
well the extended shaft was absorbing the force of my impact so I cant the harmonic off of it cut the shaft off grinded the shaft down till my impact socket would bite it good and that still didn't work🤣 I've tried all the wedging breaker bar tricks. I've got 1 more trick up my sleeve. Going to remove the started tomorrow lock up the fly wheel where the motor cant turn and try to get it off with a ton of leverage. Because I had a similar issue fixing wheel studs that broke on my buddies f150 and the impact I had wasnt strong enough but with a ratchet and 3ft hydraulic Jack pole the leverage created made it happen like butter. I WILL NOT GIVE UP!🤣🤷‍♂️
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I'm sure you may have tried this already but I would heat up that threaded area a little bit then soak it with pb blaster a couple times then with the impact work it both directions to see it will break loose. Sometimes you have to tighten it a little to break the corrosion in order to loosen it.
 

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Had to replace that thing on my 1997 DOHC 6 when the rubber in the pulley came loose. Impact would not budge it. What finally did was I removed the access cover to get at the flexplate. I got my biggest, longest, flat blade screwdriver and wedge it up in there so I could hold it against one of the bolts that holds the plate to the torque converter.

To get the thing loose, I have a 29" long 1/2" extension and a 12" long breaker bar with a 1/2" square hole in the end of its handle, into which I plugged a couple more extensions. Then while I held the engine from turning I had a really strong friend reef on the bar to get the threads popped loose.

After that it was nearly finger turning loose. When installing the new, all metal with no rubber, no bearing bracket, pulley, we just gave it a little snug tap because the engine turning and resistance from the steering pump, AC, and alternator would take care of tightening it any more, if it would. If that unscrews by itself you have some major problem.

So if you're doing this on your own, bite the bullet and buy the wedge/chock that fits into the flexplate teeth and wedges against the bellhousing or bolts onto one of the access cover holes, and obtain somehow a really long breaker bar.

But you ain't seen tight with this. The tightest nuts I ever encountered were the lug nuts on a Can-Am Commander UTV. I have no idea how the assembly line F'ed up so bad, or how they got that much torque on without snapping the lugs off. I had my breaker bar with super long extension plugged in 41" combined. At the time I weighed 210 pounds and I had to jump three or four times at the end of that to get every nut loose. When they'd let go it would CRACK and PING like hitting a steel anvil with a hammer. After unscrewing them I bit I torqued them properly. The UTV's owner was glad to hear about that because if I hadn't had to remove the right front wheel during the heater install I wouldn't have discovered the super tightened nuts and if he'd gotten a flat out in the boonies he'd have been stuck.

Anyone want to do the calculations on the force of 210 pounds falling onto the end of a 41" long bar from a starting position about 12" above the bar?
 
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