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I just experienced a bad ac clutch and bearing on my son's compressor. It was screaming and I had to do something. The unit has leaked for a few years now so not really using the ac. Instead of removing the compressor which is a pain in the arse on this 2000 ford Taurus DOHC I decided to just remove the clutch in place. The bolt is a 8MM it can be cracked loose by sliding a long screw driver down between the nubs to hold it in place. Once you get the bolt out the outer clutch comes right out. I'm not worried about spacers because I will not be replacing the clutch. Here comes the hardest part of this job. There is very little room between the pulley and the inner fender. I had you use a telacospic mirror to see the snap ring inside the pulley. A pain in the arse for sure. Patience is key here. I used this snap on pick to get in one of the holes and really put pressure on it and it finally came off. It took awhile so don't give up. Then you can start prying the pulley off by rotating and prying. Once off I used a large socket and hammer to get the worn bearing out. There are plenty of videos that show you how to do it. I cleaned everything tapped in the new sealed bearing put the pulley back on the snap ring went in easy with snap ring plyers. I did not replace the clutch because he will not be using the ac. It's like running the bypass pulley without removing the compressor. Attached are a few photos and a video of it running nice and quiet like.
It appears my video of the car running without the clutch is to big to upload anyway take my word on it. I
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hope this helps somebody facing the same issue. Good luck.
 

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I just experienced a bad ac clutch and bearing on my son's compressor. It was screaming and I had to do something. The unit has leaked for a few years now so not really using the ac. Instead of removing the compressor which is a pain in the arse on this 2000 ford Taurus DOHC I decided to just remove the clutch in place. The bolt is a 8MM it can be cracked loose by sliding a long screw driver down between the nubs to hold it in place. Once you get the bolt out the outer clutch comes right out. I'm not worried about spacers because I will not be replacing the clutch. Here comes the hardest part of this job. There is very little room between the pulley and the inner fender. I had you use a telacospic mirror to see the snap ring inside the pulley. A pain in the arse for sure. Patience is key here. I used this snap on pick to get in one of the holes and really put pressure on it and it finally came off. It took awhile so don't give up. Then you can start prying the pulley off by rotating and prying. Once off I used a large socket and hammer to get the worn bearing out. There are plenty of videos that show you how to do it. I cleaned everything tapped in the new sealed bearing put the pulley back on the snap ring went in easy with snap ring plyers. I did not replace the clutch because he will not be using the ac. It's like running the bypass pulley without removing the compressor. Attached are a few photos and a video of it running nice and quiet like.
It appears my video of the car running without the clutch is to big to upload anyway take my word on it. I View attachment 215651 View attachment 215652 View attachment 215653 View attachment 215654 View attachment 215651 View attachment 215652 View attachment 215653 View attachment 215654 View attachment 215653 View attachment 215654 hope this helps somebody facing the same issue. Good luck.
Yes my heater and defroster still work. The AC clutch has nothing to do with heat or defrost.
I just experienced a bad ac clutch and bearing on my son's compressor. It was screaming and I had to do something. The unit has leaked for a few years now so not really using the ac. Instead of removing the compressor which is a pain in the arse on this 2000 ford Taurus DOHC I decided to just remove the clutch in place. The bolt is a 8MM it can be cracked loose by sliding a long screw driver down between the nubs to hold it in place. Once you get the bolt out the outer clutch comes right out. I'm not worried about spacers because I will not be replacing the clutch. Here comes the hardest part of this job. There is very little room between the pulley and the inner fender. I had you use a telacospic mirror to see the snap ring inside the pulley. A pain in the arse for sure. Patience is key here. I used this snap on pick to get in one of the holes and really put pressure on it and it finally came off. It took awhile so don't give up. Then you can start prying the pulley off by rotating and prying. Once off I used a large socket and hammer to get the worn bearing out. There are plenty of videos that show you how to do it. I cleaned everything tapped in the new sealed bearing put the pulley back on the snap ring went in easy with snap ring plyers. I did not replace the clutch because he will not be using the ac. It's like running the bypass pulley without removing the compressor. Attached are a few photos and a video of it running nice and quiet like.
It appears my video of the car running without the clutch is to big to upload anyway take my word on it.
I would hot wire the A/C clutch through the relay socket. Pic is hot wire of starter so I could check the starter without activating the fuel system. Hot wire the A/C and it will hold the plate still for removal and reinstall of the bolt.
-chart-
 

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Quote:
"Yes my heater and defroster still work. The AC clutch has nothing to do with heat or defrost"

Not entirely true. While you will still be able to defrost, the A/C that is normally activated in Defrost mode acts as a dehumidifier to assist in removing cabin moisture in humid conditions allowing for a quicker defrost.

I, too, managed to swap out the clutch hub and pulley/brg using this method. It tested my patience trying to remove the c-clip using a mirror-on-a-stick and angled snap ring pliers...but, it was less work than coming at it from below and having to remove the four mtg bolts to slide the compressor back. Fortunately, my compressor still held a charge and I have managed to get another 2 yrs out of it so far.
 

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You mentioned it was a pain in the arse to remove the clutch. I did this job by lowering the engine. The job is rather easy once the engine is lowered.
 

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It's a judgement call. Those of us who live in the Rust Belt run the risk of seized and/or broken sub-frame bolts or their captive nuts in order to lower the cradle/engine.
 

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I remove the sub frame bolts, one at a time when I buy a used Bull. Then I drop the sub for struts or BJ, and for Alt on the DOHC. I grease the bolt shank and threads up to the point where they engage the nut. As time goes on, easy to remove. I figure sooner or later they have to come out. On my '01 I had to replace the sub frame due to rust. No issue with the bolts.
-chart-
 

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I did my a/c clutch from above, here is the link with photos.

 

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On more than one Ford product I've had to replace the clutch because I found high cycle fatigue cracks in the thin radial ribs.
 
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