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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1999 Taurus Wagon with Front/Rear Discs and ABS.
When I look at Ford Dealer Part lists such as Tasca Ford, there appears to be only one Master Cylinder Part Number: 3F1Z-2140-AA
Rockauto.com lists several different vendors, but the descriptions do not differentiate between Disk/Drum and Disc/Disc, or Sedan/Wagon.
Vendor catalogs, such as Raybestos, only seem to list one part for all 1999 models as well.

Raybestos Catalog - Ford Taurus

Can this be correct? I can't imagine that the pressure differences between discs and drums would be close enough to allow this. Or is there a brake bias valve in line.

I really have searched the forum, and several posts say that there are multiple master cylinder part numbers, but I can't find them.

I would really appreciate any advice.

Dale
 

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I have a 1999 Taurus Wagon with Front/Rear Discs and ABS.
When I look at Ford Dealer Part lists such as Tasca Ford, there appears to be only one Master Cylinder Part Number: 3F1Z-2140-AA
Rockauto.com lists several different vendors, but the descriptions do not differentiate between Disk/Drum and Disc/Disc, or Sedan/Wagon.
Vendor catalogs, such as Raybestos, only seem to list one part for all 1999 models as well.

Raybestos Catalog - Ford Taurus

Can this be correct? I can't imagine that the pressure differences between discs and drums would be close enough to allow this. Or is there a brake bias valve in line.

I really have searched the forum, and several posts say that there are multiple master cylinder part numbers, but I can't find them.

I would really appreciate any advice.

Dale
I do not think wagons have ever used drums in rear. ABS or no ABS should not care about the master cylinder. Sometime in the past there may have been drums on wagons but I have had 4 and all were discs in the rear. ABS and ABS/TCS all are after the master cylinder.
-chart-
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I do not think wagons have ever used drums in rear. ABS or no ABS should not care about the master cylinder. Sometime in the past there may have been drums on wagons but I have had 4 and all were discs in the rear. ABS and ABS/TCS all are after the master cylinder.
-chart-
I agree. I thought most wagons were front/rear discs.
I am under the impression after 1996, most sedans were disc/drums to save money after disappointing sales with the new model. Given that the sedans are much more common than the wagon, does rockauto.com and other parts sellers, just list a Master Cylinder for the sedan?
Ford has obsoleted the Master Cylinders for this car, so one has to go with aftermarket vendors. I'm just not sure how accurate their catalog listings are.

It seems like there is only one Master Cylinder for all Taurus brake combinations. Is that a fair assumption?

Dale
 

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I agree. I thought most wagons were front/rear discs.
I am under the impression after 1996, most sedans were disc/drums to save money after disappointing sales with the new model. Given that the sedans are much more common than the wagon, does rockauto.com and other parts sellers, just list a Master Cylinder for the sedan?
Ford has obsoleted the Master Cylinders for this car, so one has to go with aftermarket vendors. I'm just not sure how accurate their catalog listings are.

It seems like there is only one Master Cylinder for all Taurus brake combinations. Is that a fair assumption?

Dale
My 98 LX has 4wheel disks. has caused me much grief at times working on them

b
 

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Looking at the service manual for the 2000 Taurus SE for the 4WDB systems and at the OEM sticker of my own wagon both list the ABS as standard equipment. On page 206-06-02 the manual lists only ONE brake master cylinder (2140). On page 206-09-02, one paragraph in reference to the ABS control valve assemble states "The hydraulic control unit has additional internal solenoid valves incorporated to enable control of modulation of the wheel brake pressures." When looking at the system hydraulic and electrical diagrams, it appears the only thing the master cylinder does is apply hydraulic pressure input to the ABS system and the system supplies all the necessary fluid flow and modulated pressures to all four disc brakes based upon transducer sensing of the input pressure from the master cylinder.
In essence, they took the same principles of hydraulic operation of aircraft anti-block braking systems and applied them to control the brakes of an automobile.
This type of ABS system has been used on heavy trucks, buses and trains using air signaling systems to air operated relay valves for many decades. Today they do the controls with electronics instead of direct air or direct hydraulics.
Make any sense? Hope so.
 
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