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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Evening Everyone!! This is my first post/thread here and after a few hours of searching I thought I'd join and ask my question. :wub:

I'm needing to replace the rod bearings in my 1999 3.0 Taurus. Is this possible without removing the engine. I've seen some people do it on the mid 90's models, but just curious about this one. I've don't have the ability to pull the engine, I have the know how, just not the tools and engine lift at my disposal. Thanks for the help, any links to said question would be greatly appreciated. Thanks again.
 

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should be able to do it in the car fine. also which 3.0 engine do you have? the vulcan (ohv) or the duratec (dohc)?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've got the OHV engine. I didn't know if anyone had done it. I would hate to start it and wind up having to pull the engine.
 

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if you are doing only rod bearings and not main bearings then the engine should not have to be removed. just remove the oil pan (may require dropping or removing the exhaust y-pipe) the remove each rod bearing cap (i prefer one at a time so as not to get them mixed up) with that piston lower than top dead center. inspect crank if good, install new bearings and plastigauge, followed by final install if within specs. shouldnt be too hard overall.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's what I was hoping. It looks like I'll be starting to do it tomorrow then. Thanks for the help man, it's greatly appreciated.

Brian
 

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Mains?

if you are doing only rod bearings and not main bearings then the engine should not have to be removed. just remove the oil pan (may require dropping or removing the exhaust y-pipe) the remove each rod bearing cap (i prefer one at a time so as not to get them mixed up) with that piston lower than top dead center. inspect crank if good, install new bearings and plastigauge, followed by final install if within specs. shouldnt be too hard overall.
I have replaced the rods and mains in both the Vulcan and Essex in the car. I would not do one and not the other. Replacing the bearings is not difficult, just need to be careful to put them back in the right direction, clean, and torqued. One bearing at a time of course.

Careful though with size. Engines are made with undersized from the factory, usually oney -0.002" They have been known to not be marked as under. Plastigauge will make it for sure the right size. Old School undesize was common, unlikely today. I had a 1964 260 V8 with undersized and not market. Last I heard for sure was a Chrysler 318 with +.020 cylinder bores. Chrylser does not admit and they have no parts. No aftermakret available. Owner had to have them made by a race engine supply.

And along that line. The Vulcan I did had good bearings. I had it open as they only had one bolt in the front main bearing. Had a knock!:p Had 100K on it and I bought the bearing set before opening it up. Front oil seal was leaking.

Good Luck

-chart-
 

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It had just a bolt from factory? No wonder the seal was leaking, that end was moving probably "all over" the place. Well... not really , but enough to mess the sealing.
 

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Missing Bolt

It had just a bolt from factory? No wonder the seal was leaking, that end was moving probably "all over" the place. Well... not really , but enough to mess the sealing.
The seal started to leak and drip on the exhaust.
I went to replace the seal, and when I took the damper off, I saw the shaft move up and down. That is bad.

I think the timing chain and belt helped keep it from too much thump.

I replaced the bearing cap and new bolts from ford.

No harm, ran a long time.

-chart-
 
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