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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Whats up everyone, this is my first post and im already looking for some help.

As the title says, i have a 1996 GL Taurus. The radiator finally bit the dust a couple days back and i don't really have the $300 to drop on a mechanic right now so...i'm hoping to do this one myself.

So Ive done some research, from what ive gathered the 96' DROPS from the bottom, you don't pull it up through the top (like the LAST mechanic who put this one in tried to do...moron) and it also looks like i have to remove the headlights and front bumper cover...but I'm hoping there is someone on here who has done this before and can kinda help me along.

I'm a visual person so if you have photos that would be great...if not..i'll do what i can with whatever you write :).

Thanks all
 

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2003 Ford taurus Centennial Edition
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No you only need to disconnect the tranny coolant lines and remove the pan on the bottom covering the radiator. I did mine.... so this is basically all that you need to remove...just be careful of the A/C conderser. I would recommend blowing off the condenser, it might help in cooling, I think it did mine!!
I would recommend getting or looking online at the chilton manual for additional help. Also look at the top of this page for the... topic finder, there you should find a section on removing the radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
No you only need to disconnect the tranny coolant lines and remove the pan on the bottom covering the radiator. I did mine.... so this is basically all that you need to remove...just be careful of the A/C conderser. I would recommend blowing off the condenser, it might help in cooling, I think it did mine!!
I would recommend getting or looking online at the chilton manual for additional help. Also look at the top of this page for the... topic finder, there you should find a section on removing the radiator.
Thanks for the reply.

I tried the topic finder for radiator removal but the only one that showed up is for the 1995 and older model, which i know is different than the 96'.
I'll have to look up what the AC condenser is/looks like :).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
No you only need to disconnect the tranny coolant lines and remove the pan on the bottom covering the radiator. I did mine.... so this is basically all that you need to remove...just be careful of the A/C conderser. I would recommend blowing off the condenser, it might help in cooling, I think it did mine!!
I would recommend getting or looking online at the chilton manual for additional help. Also look at the top of this page for the... topic finder, there you should find a section on removing the radiator.
Didn't happen to mean the AC COMPRESSOR did you?
 

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I remove and replaced my radiator last winter (2010) on a 1997 Sable. There's a few tricks to doing this job. If you haven't done this before allow 6 to 8 hours.

Radiator comes out from the bottom, allow for about 21" clearance. Radiator is about 17" tall. Car ramps should do just fine. Get yourself a 3/8" quick disconnect tool from you auto retailer. The disconnect tool is used to remove and replace the transmission lines - get familiar how to use it.

Pop the hood. There are 1" holes next to each headlamp. Take a flashlight and peek into each hole. The radiator and A/C condenser are held in place by a bolt. These upper radiator bolts are somewhat a PITA when installing the new radiator as alignment becomes difficult.

Other than the upper radiator bolts and quick disconnect tool this job is straight forward. Well worth the time to saving money.

Performance Radiator sells a good replacement. You're going to get plenty dirty among anti-freeze, dirt and tranny fluid. Be prepared for cleaning up and take your time.

I see you're in Gilbert. Good luck Zonie, I'm a Zonie to ! :) I can't wait to return to AZ !

Monsoon
 

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2003 Ford taurus Centennial Edition
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You might also check out rockauto (there are 5% discount codes posted here..just do a search for rockauto discount codes) not much ,but every little bit helps.
They offer several choices at different price ranges.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I remove and replaced my radiator last winter (2010) on a 1997 Sable. There's a few tricks to doing this job. If you haven't done this before allow 6 to 8 hours.

Radiator comes out from the bottom, allow for about 21" clearance. Radiator is about 17" tall. Car ramps should do just fine. Get yourself a 3/8" quick disconnect tool from you auto retailer. The disconnect tool is used to remove and replace the transmission lines - get familiar how to use it.

Pop the hood. There are 1" holes next to each headlamp. Take a flashlight and peek into each hole. The radiator and A/C condenser are held in place by a bolt. These upper radiator bolts are somewhat a PITA when installing the new radiator as alignment becomes difficult.

Other than the upper radiator bolts and quick disconnect tool this job is straight forward. Well worth the time to saving money.

Performance Radiator sells a good replacement. You're going to get plenty dirty among anti-freeze, dirt and tranny fluid. Be prepared for cleaning up and take your time.

I see you're in Gilbert. Good luck Zonie, I'm a Zonie to ! :) I can't wait to return to AZ !

Monsoon
I was wondering with a name like MONSOON if you were from here lol. You missed the BIG ONE if you weren't here this summer.

Are these the tools you are talking about OEM/1/4, 1/2, 5/16 and 3/8 in. quick disconnect tool set (25182) | Line Disconnect Tool | AutoZone.com

I saw a video of a guy saying that he actually unscrewed the whole nut from the radiator that had the tranny line but then learned later he could have just popped out the clip...is that what you're talking about using it for?

Me and a friend will be doing this so hopefully having an extra set of hands and eyes will really help out. I read through my Haynes manual yesterday (finally found it)...basically it said:

Drain the fluid
Take out the headlights and hood latch
Take out 15 bolts that attach the front bumper cover
Disconnect the lower hoses (antifreeze and tranny lines)
Disconnect the upper hoses (same as above)
Then disconnect the mounting bolts.

Im sure it sounds easier than it is but does that sound about right?
Thanks for the help, where in az are you coming back to?

You might also check out rockauto (there are 5% discount codes posted here..just do a search for rockauto discount codes) not much ,but every little bit helps.
They offer several choices at different price ranges.
I think i'm just going to go to the Zone man. I figure if imma do all this work i want a lifetime warranty on the stupid radiator...and for like $120 it's worth it. Appreciate it though :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So I'm almost there...have the headlights out...front bumper cover off...power steering coolant in front of the radiator is removed...top radiator coolant hose is removed...now I'm trying to find the lower hose and the 2 'Transaxel cooler lines'

Then the transaxle coolerbracket and the 2 lower condenser to radiator bolts and the lower radiator screws. *sigh*

WHY they put no pictures of any of this crap in the book i dont know...time to try to find out where all these goodies are at...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
so there is no way to take it out from the top?
Not that im aware of. I got mine finished, dropped out of the bottom with no problem. Most time consuming part was removing the steel lines that plug into the radiator for the power steering cooling but if you have the little tool that releases the clip im sure it would be much easier.

Once you drop it and go to put the new one back in...an extra set of hands up top to help hold it in place is helpful for sure, you can do it solo but like i said, an extra set of hands is always nice :)
 

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One thing about those quick-release transmission line connectors I learned quickly (A/C connectors are the same type with the doughnut-shaped spring....BTW, in geometry a 3D shape like that is called a "torus." What a coincidence...:p) is to push the line INTO the fitting as far as it can go to take the tension off of the spring, then slip the release tool into position. The line comes out so easily you'll think you did something wrong.
 

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One thing about those quick-release transmission line connectors I learned quickly (A/C connectors are the same type with the doughnut-shaped spring....BTW, in geometry a 3D shape like that is called a "torus." What a coincidence...:p) is to push the line INTO the fitting as far as it can go to take the tension off of the spring, then slip the release tool into position. The line comes out so easily you'll think you did something wrong.
Well, that depends. I have a slightly leaking trannie cooler line on my 97.
For the life of me, i cannot seem to get the trannie line to release.
Granted, this is with everything connected so access is limited with the
radiator hose in the way.

You cannot use the wide version of the release tool for this. Only the donut shaped tool will fit thought the access hole next to the lower
radiator hose
 

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Well, that depends. I have a slightly leaking trannie cooler line on my 97.
For the life of me, i cannot seem to get the trannie line to release.
Granted, this is with everything connected so access is limited with the
radiator hose in the way.

You cannot use the wide version of the release tool for this. Only the donut shaped tool will fit thought the access hole next to the lower
radiator hose
I never said they were ideal lol. this is one reason I got rid of the darn things and went to flared fittings and rubber hose all around. No leaks, either.
 

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I never said they were ideal lol. this is one reason I got rid of the darn things and went to flared fittings and rubber hose all around. No leaks, either.
So what is the part number of the fitting that goes into the lower tranie
cooler hole on a gen 3 radiator to convert it to a barb type fitting?
 

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No idea. I took my Gen1 existing QR radiator fittings to a local independent auto parts/speed shop, told them what I wanted and showed them the required threading to fit the radiator. They did the rest. I now have ⅜" ID circulation all the way through the system instead of the original 5/16" which is a decent increase in fluid flow.

When I was doing all this other members here kept quoting other IDs, so I imagine the fitting size depends on the generation if not specific model year. So, my specific info probably won't help you with your Gen3.
 
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