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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Is the different color boot on the distributor cap to coil wire, or on a plug wire?
The different colored boot is on one of the spark plug wires, it's one of the spark plug boots. And I believe it's on one of the longer wires as well.
 

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My Motorcraft plug wires were numbered so is it on the #1 plug wire?
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
My Motorcraft plug wires were numbered so is it on the #1 plug wire?
I'll look for numbers on the wires again. On a 88 Taurus with the 3.0 is the #1 cylinder on the front right of the engine? Or if I am looking at the engine from the front of the car with the hood open back side towards the fire wall all the way to the passenger side?
 

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On sidewinder engines the #1 plug is passenger side firewall. My Motorcraft plug wires all had the cylinder # imprinted on the wire run, along with the Motorcraft logo. Just wondering if some one hasn't swapped a faulty plug wire in, maybe they have highlighted the #1 plug with a different color boot???? My boots were all the same color. So Inspect the odd one for defects & the wire for the same imprinted nomenclature as the others.

Then use your multimeter to check for end to end continuity & resistance range for the wire length, which is about 1000 ohms per inch of length, 30K ohms Max, no matter the length.

If you haven't done so, also consider replacing the distributor cap & rotor with Motorcraft, mine were Very high quality.
I'm not easily favorably impressed & don't frivolously hand out atta-boys' so if you get an atta-boy from me, you've done Good.... no, REAL GOOD!!!! lol
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
On sidewinder engines the #1 plug is passenger side firewall. My Motorcraft plug wires all had the cylinder # imprinted on the wire run, along with the Motorcraft logo. Just wondering if some one hasn't swapped a faulty plug wire in, maybe they have highlighted the #1 plug with a different color boot???? My boots were all the same color. So Inspect the odd one for defects & the wire for the same imprinted nomenclature as the others.

Then use your multimeter to check for end to end continuity & resistance range for the wire length, which is about 1000 ohms per inch of length, 30K ohms Max, no matter the length.

If you haven't done so, also consider replacing the distributor cap & rotor with Motorcraft, mine were Very high quality.
I'm not easily favorably impressed & don't frivolously hand out atta-boys' so if you get an atta-boy from me, you've done Good.... no, REAL GOOD!!!! lol
I was able to get the new wires installed this weekend and they fit perfectly. I was worried that maybe a couple of them would be to short, but that was not the case. Between the new wires and new EGR parts I do not think the engine has run this smooth in a long time. I did drive it around some and it did feel like it had better power than before, and it will be interesting to see if my gas mileage is affected some as well. I do not know what the factory specifications are for mileage is, but I have had as high at 29 mpg, and as low as 24 mpg.
 

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Ok good feedback & to hear the new wires fit & its finally running better after the Ignition & EGR systems work.
That mpg sounds about right for the 3.0L summer to winter range, depending on where you live, cold weather & mountain terrain wise. Warmer temps, flatter terrain, less traffic, tires properly aired up = better mpg
 
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Ok good feedback & to hear the new wires fit & its finally running better after the Ignition & EGR systems work.
That mpg sounds about right for the 3.0L summer to winter range, depending on were you live, cold weather & mountain terrain wise. Warmer temps, flatter terrain, less traffic, tires properly aired up = better mpg
I guess the next one I need to tackle is the code 88 that the reader gave me the other day. The code 88 has something to do with the cooling fan circuit. It does work, however it seems the temperature has to climb some before the fan finally kicks on. The winter time I have not worried about it much, and during the summer I have the AC on but there are times in between where it does need to run. There is a sensor on top of the engine close to the thermostat housing and I have replaced it, but it never made a difference.
 

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I guess the next one I need to tackle is the code 88 that the reader gave me the other day. The code 88 has something to do with the cooling fan circuit. It does work, however it seems the temperature has to climb some before the fan finally kicks on. The winter time I have not worried about it much, and during the summer I have the AC on but there are times in between where it does need to run. There is a sensor on top of the engine close to the thermostat housing and I have replaced it, but it never made a difference.
The cooling fans are 2 speed. Low comes on at some temperature, like 210 or so, and high at some higher temp like 220. Not exact numbers. Low speed uses a resistor and they can burn out. If that is the case you have no low speed fan. I had a resistor fail as I remember on '88 and for sure '03 Taurus. Got 2 resistors at the JY, one good one burned out. A/C uses low speed without reguard to coolant temp.
-chart-
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
The cooling fans are 2 speed. Low comes on at some temperature, like 210 or so, and high at some higher temp like 220. Not exact numbers. Low speed uses a resistor and they can burn out. If that is the case you have no low speed fan. I had a resistor fail as I remember on '88 and for sure '03 Taurus. Got 2 resistors at the JY, one good one burned out. A/C uses low speed without reguard to coolant temp.
-chart-
I figured that would be the case, either a relay, fuse, or resistor. That probably happened when the original fan burned up years ago. Where is this resistor located so I can have a look at them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I figured that would be the case, either a relay, fuse, or resistor. That probably happened when the original fan burned up years ago. Where is this resistor located so I can have a look at them?
I found the resistor, it sits just below the air box right on the bellhousing of the transmission. As soon as it warms up I will check and see if I can get an ohm reading off of it. If it is bad I have new ones online.
 

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I found the resistor, it sits just below the air box right on the bellhousing of the transmission. As soon as it warms up I will check and see if I can get an ohm reading off of it. If it is bad I have new ones online.
My first gen had the resistor on the engine block front of the car, down low. High fail rate due to water splash. They are power resistors and get quite hot. Water splash on the hot ceramic cover breaks it. So now they are top side in the fan shroud and open wire resistor.
-chart-
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
My first gen had the resistor on the engine block front of the car, down low. High fail rate due to water splash. They are power resistors and get quite hot. Water splash on the hot ceramic cover breaks it. So now they are top side in the fan shroud and open wire resistor.
-chart-
So for an update I did finally get to measure the resistance in the ceramic resistor and I do show an open in that resistor. That would explain why the fan no longer worked in the low position, and has not in years. I found a NOS one and will replace it as soon as it gets here. The old one happens to sit on the bellhousing of the transmission so it wasn't broken. I believe the damage occurred when old fan motor seized up many years ago and burned it out. Also why I was in there I had to replace the temperature sending unit as the old one quit last week.
 

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Good trouble shooting find & feedback, keep chipping away & fixing the anomalies & it'll be close to its former self.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Good trouble shooting find & feedback, keep chipping away & fixing the anomalies & it'll be close to its former self.
Not sure if there may still be something wrong or not, but when I replaced the ceramic resistor, that didn't seem to change anything. What else is in that circuit that I will need to look at?
 

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If the cooling fan motor shorted out badly enough to fry the cooling fan dropping resistor, then it seems to me the wiring, electrical connectors pins / sockets & their wire crimps, all the way to the fan motor imrc power relay contacts, belong on the suspect list for over heat / voltage drop under load damage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
If the cooling fan motor shorted out badly enough to fry the cooling fan dropping resistor, then it seems to me the wiring, electrical connectors pins / sockets & their wire crimps, all the way to the fan motor imrc power relay contacts, belong on the suspect list for over heat / voltage drop under load damage.
So the fan will turn on when I run the AC, or it reaches the high position to kick it on. I had replaced the thermo switch on top of the motor some time back. When you pull the connector off of that the fan will turn on. The pins inside the connector for the dropping resistor looked clean and I couldn't see any heat damage. The IMRC power relay must be in that small black box that sits on the radiator, correct? I have had one of these opened up once and if I can pin down which relay it is, is a panel mount relay available to replace the possible bad one?
 

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Yes, atop the radiator under the plastic cover with the emissions decal on it, is were my 94 imrc is.
 

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I don't know about a new replacement power relay now days, but maybe you could find a reasonably priced donor imrc relay in a salvage yard, or remove the old one, test its solenoid winding & see if it'll work & try cleaning the contacts if corroded or oxidized & see how it goes.
 

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While I'm remembering, between the drivers side top of the radiator & battery, follow 2 black ground wires (that are fastened atop the upper radiator support) & drop down about a foot, to a black electrical disconnect connector. Because of it's location close to the battery, radiator, grill & the connector Not being sealed, make its contacts subject to corrosion from battery acid, salt spray & coolant running down, or dripping on the unsealed connector & these two grounds end up in the IMRC!!!! So be sure to inspect the connector pins / sockets & both wires lug connection atop the drivers side upper radiator support. Murphys Law gotta love this one, for all of the great possibilities to cause mischief without much effort!!!






,
 
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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I don't know about a new replacement power relay now days, but maybe you could find a reasonably priced donor imrc relay in a salvage yard, or remove the old one, test its solenoid winding & see if it'll work & try cleaning the contacts if corroded or oxidized & see how it goes.
I found a supplier for the relays online, and while looking for relays I also found this article that came from a T-Bird forum back in 2004. I will have to look and see how similar the IRCM is to mine, but the photo makes it look the same. Here is a link to the article: NATO - Ford IRCM Schematic & Troubleshooting
 
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