For anyone looking to convert all the lightbulbs to LED.... - Page 2 - Taurus Car Club of America : Ford Taurus Forum
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 08-30-2014, 09:43 AM
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Might try looking at the links here:
https://www.taurusclub.com/forum/193-...echnology.html
Then reaching out to Nick C. with any questions

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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-23-2015, 05:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoSloSho View Post
I never understood why people even put resistors (spelling??) in with LEDs. The whole point of LEDs is to draw less power out of the electrical systems (and it looks sweet and sometimes brighter) but putting a resistor in just uses the same amount of energy. But the different flasher really helps.
I'll tell you why I use resistors:
1. The resistor is connected only over the blinker circuit. So that is an intermittent load that doesn't count that much. I didn't change the bulb to LED because of that, but because the fact that my parking light where ORANGE (combo bulb with the blinker).
2. Note that now the parking lights are LED too (white) and those are running all the time, so I am "saving" energy with them 100x more than what I don't save with the blinker.
3. Why I didn't use a modified relay that doesn't "hyper-blink" without resistors?
Because my rear bulbs are still normal. If one of them burns out, I have the hyper-blinking notification for that event. With a modded relay, I don't.
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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 06-23-2015, 06:13 PM
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I have installed in front a LED blinker/parking light combo in place of original 3457A bulb (orange-painted version of 3157A). The parking light turns off automatically when turn signal is on, to maximize the LED blinking visibility.
The headlight bulb is GE 9007NHP (Nighthawk PLATINUM).
Under the dash, I have cut one wire, solder the diodes and cover the joints with thermal shrink tube. Attached is the diagram. I have used two Schottky diodes in one capsule (STPS60L45CW) because of their reduced voltage drop (and because I had one laying around), but probably any diodes that are rated minimum 3 Amp (36W) are good.
On the 2001 schematic I have shown the connectors location (pin numbers are marked on the connectors) and also the resistors needed for correct blinking rate of the turn signal.

Video in bright daylight:
http://youtu.be/gqKxfhj3jcM

Video at night:
https://youtu.be/3K6qMT6N31Q
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 04-25-2016, 08:44 AM
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<not sure about the etiquette in regards to old threads, but since this is a sticky, and I have some info that may help people out in the future>

There are ways to convert lighting over to LEDs without having to put a series load resistor to emulate the resistance of a filament.

-A quick lesson on why low current devices cause hyperflashing (see http://i.imgur.com/AZVrxv9.gif)
-most timing circuits use a 555 chip that internally compares two levels of voltage (high is defined from 2/3 vcc to vcc and low is 0 to 1/3 vcc)
-a flip flop circuit that is tried to the output of the chip will change from low to high depending upon the voltage seen on the op amps
-the time it takes for the circuit to reach ~63.2 % of VCC is known as the RC time constant tau () and directly dependent upon resistance and capacitance of the circuit
-since leds pull less current than filaments, the flasher unit thinks there is a blown light circuit henceforth hyperflashes

One way to compensate is swapping out the resistor (to a higher value) within the flasher itself to slow the flasher unit down.
Another way which neglects any power savings but results in more ideal current regulation and higher light output, involves usage of transistor downstream in whats known as a current mirror (see http://www.allaboutcircuits.com/textbook/semiconductors/chpt-4/current-mirrors/).

The way the current mirror works is by using a bias voltage between the collector (top most leg shown in the diagram) and the base (middle straight leg), as well as a gain factor beta (β). For a standard Bipolar Junction Transistor, the voltage between the base and the emitter (bottom most leg, denoted by the arrow) is 0.7 volts. What this means is the voltage on the base leg(s) will always be 0.7 volts higher than the emitter and VCC will be the base voltage plus the voltage dropped on the biasing resistor. The amount of current going through the bais resistor is typically the gain factor beta plus the current going into the base, but since the gain factor is usually orders of magnitude greater the base current can be disregarded.

So mathematically:
Voltage (of the) Collector (leg)= VCC-(β)( Bias resistor)
Voltage (of the) Base (leg) = Voltage (of the) Collector (leg)
Voltage (of the) Emitter (leg) = Voltage (of the) Base (leg) -0.7 Volts

Or in one equation: VCC-(β)( Bias resistor)-0.7 Volts =0 Volts
The goal of this circuit is, since all the base legs are tied together, the voltages on the other legs must also be the same, therefore the currents will also be same (this is based upon usage of similar components being used). In this configuration, the sum of the currents should add up to the point where the flasher unit will see a current similar to a filament system.

Hope this info helps you guys out.
Joe
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Last edited by cybhunter; 04-25-2016 at 08:46 AM.
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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-26-2019, 10:42 AM
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I don't think this has been mentioned earlier in the thread, when replacing filament lamps with LED's you may want to pay attention to the color temperature of the replacement LED, especially for interior lighting. Non color specific LED's range from warm white (yellow white), which is closer to a filament lamp, to daylight (blue white) which is similar to light on cloudless blue-sky day. I found that bluish light from the upper spectrum (5000-7000 kelvin) tended to be harsher on the eyes at night while light from the low end up to medium white (2800-4000 kelvin) was easier to tolerate.
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post #16 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-06-2019, 06:13 PM
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I have to come back to this thread with a note. I had to switch the white/amber LED combo with an Amber/Amber LED combo. Why? Because state inspection and VA state laws. The way the 2001 headlight is shaped, allows that the parking light /blinker to be visible from straight ahead and also from side of the car.
In this way Ford didn't have to add a side bulb.
The parking light viewed from front can be amber or white.
But, many states' laws state that the light viewed on the side of the car can be only amber or red (red can be located only past the rear wheel). Not white. So that's the reason why the OE bulb is required to be Amber.
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Last edited by SoNic67; 05-06-2019 at 06:15 PM.
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